Us Tennis Parents
Things about Junior Tennis

May
13

Teaching your own kids for free on a public court should be your right. However the current rules are:

NO  ball basket to teach your kids on ANY public court? Is that legal?  Is it legal to bar someone From bringing Your kids and a ball basket to a public court? If you are giving your own kids lessons for free it should No problem, but why is it that public courts are trying to enforcing that rule. It looks like that they don’t care about supporting our youth, they are only protective because they care about the money.  They don’t want other tennis parents to watch a good lesson from a “regular” mom or dad, because these parents may wonder  that this is way better  than the local pro or city program.

Many cities are looking for any form of revenue and collecting fees is just one way! But it is still wrong, public courts are paid with taxpayers money and should be available to the public. The use of public courts and the “mafia” like behaviour is not even In the minds of elected officials, make enough noise and rules will be changed. A city official don’t want any publicity that states that she/he does not care about kids.

But wow the rule “NO ball basket on ANY public court” is wrong, it is wrong because it is against our thinking for freedom, it is wrong because the city or county does not support our kids to get better, it is wrong to not allow parents/kids  the use of the court so that the pro can monopolize instructions.

Apr
30
Source  http://www.nova.edu/ssss/QR/QR11-1/casper.pdf

Because junior tennis players have to enforce the rules of the game against each other, cheating to give a player an unfair advantage is common. While this deviant behavior is found to be commonplace in the sport, there is little research to investigate its cause or influences. Results indicated that junior players felt that personal and parental pressures were the most common sources of perceived pressure to win that resulted in cheating behavior. The prevalence of parents who cheat was also cited as a major issue with the participants. Implications as to how the current study adds to the literature of youth cheating as well as practical implications are discussed.  

Cheating in youth tennis is a prominent issue. There are many opportunities to make a bad call or call the score in one’s favor without an outside spectator being able to overrule because the players make the line calls and report the score themselves,. The following is an example (based on the tennis warehouse forum) of how easy it is that bad calls can easily get out of hand, see the debate about Nikola Samardzic cheating in tennis. 

See tennis warehouse forum at

http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=239422&page=2

Or check out the video with 15,000 hits

The following are some Postings from the tennis warehouse for details follow the above link:

the kid does make a wrong call, but he does it rather quickly and convincingly, which could point to one of two scenarios:1) He is a master at making bad calls and does it in style …
To label someone a cheater, there has to be more than one instance where bad calls are made. Unless there is history with this particular kid …
The kid cheated. No doubt in my mind. He had time to look at the ball cleanly. He was in a weak position so he decided to win the point by cheating …
Is there a campaign in progress to expose or out Samardzic? So many people seem to want to accuse him of cheating, has he beaten a lot of juniors and they ganged up on him or is he really a cheater that has made bad calls before?
Yes. Samarjic indicates with his hands, well over 5 inches out. Sorry Samrjic defenders, no top junior has eyesight/judgemnt that bad on a ball he was clearly on top of and looking at?… Though he might have well been actively trying to delude himself. It happens, under pressure, but nothing excuses it. Shameful
Oct
29

How much money does a professional tennis player need to make compared to a MBA student. Mass media have brought large audiences to the sport, but how good must a professional really be to make a good living out of it?

Players that don’t make it past 100 or so really don’t make any money, but first let’s define the level of income in comparison to a person with a MBA degree of a “good to higher” university. This person may make 120 to 150 K from the age of let say 25 to 65. Total income until retirement is let say 5 million. The average professional tennis player will start at let say 20 and retire at the age of 30. So to make the same as the MBA student the tennis professional needs to make 500 K plus tennis related cost. A tennis professional needs to travel and needs to pay most costs.

OK what are the average costs that a tennis professional has to cover? First you need to have a part time coach that will cost an average of $500 per week (every professional would love to have a full time coach, but it is just too expensive), so yearly cost 24 K.

Let’s assume, that the tennis professional travels to 20 tournaments a year and each tournament cost an average of $ 2,000 for a ticket, rental car, etc. Total travel cost per year 40 K.

Tennis equipment for shoes, racket, strings and stringing is around 3 K per year. Fitness, massage, extra medical treatments and health insurance is around 20 K.

So the total cost per year is ~ 87K and a tennis pro needs to make a minimum of 200 K to make a living. To make this the tennis pro needs to be ranked in the top 100. Compared to the MBA student the tennis pro is still losing. In order to match the total income of the MBA student the tennis pro needs to make an average of 587 K per year and be ranked in the top 30 in the world.

So why are so many players working on reaching the professional ranks? If you love to play you don’t ask how much money you can squeeze out of it, you just do it for the love of the sport. If you just look at the money, is it a good investment compared to the MBA student? The “education” to become a tennis pro cost an average of 400 K, from the age of 4 to 20 years. After that we assume the tennis pro is able to cover the running costs with the prize money. An excellent Harvard University education costs ~ 65 K per year and 90 K per year for the MBA.

Again just looking at the cost benefit comparison, if you can get a free ride with a tennis scholarship you may win if you can get into one of the top 10 American Universities. If you don’t just save your money, the average American University is between 15 K and 25 K per year and the “education” of a tennis pro costs way more. Just one little draw back, the Ivy League universities are not offering an athletic scholarship.

If you can squeeze out a good tennis player for under 70 K total cost, you may win with a tennis scholarship at an average American University. Otherwise, just don’t even think about looking at tennis as an investment. What is the best, if Dad is paying.

Jun
03

The USTA changed the amount, draw size and endorsement rules for junior national tournaments in 2010. The changes were to have less national tournaments, by reducing the National Level 2 and 3 tournament to four each and reducing the draw size for National 2 and 3 from 64 to 32. To be clear The National Level 3 was cut from 14 to 4 tournaments, combined with the reduction of the draw size from 64 to 32. In addition some USTA section added endorsement rules, for example to be “endorsed by the section” to play in a national, the player got forced to play a specific designated tournament as entry requirement.The holy grail of winning

After parents lived through these new rules, was it a good idea? Are these changes of playing more local tournaments provide the necessary improvements for junior players?

Bottom line is, that it has become very tough to develop a player into the next age group. Prior to this change a national player could start with playing up a year earlier. The USTA wants to focus on the top national players. However there is a miscalculation in that logic, players playing up in the next age group are now forced to play local tournaments first instead of L3 nationals. These players are wasting pressures time and may not return to national level tournaments.

So instead of focus on developing better players, these players are playing the same kids over and over, again and again, year after year. A player need to go through the super series tournaments to receive sectional points, however no national points are given. Even if this player works hard until receiving enough points to be able to get into the reduced 32-size designated, the player wasted already too much time.

So playing a national L2 or L3 with the also reduced 32 draw has morphed from a playing challenge to a time challenge. The player must play more local tournaments first to collect sectional points and for many talented players there is no workable path to success to be nationally ranked. The frustration level of the parents and players are high.

Overall, many players will stay to play sectional and with the new rules will not compete in national events and the USTA has eliminated the real opportunities for top players to be considered elite.

However, even if the draw sizes and number of tournaments are reduced the number of wild cards have increased. This is just a hunch, however the USTA must know that there is a problem. And who is benefiting from these wild cards?

What is your experience as a supporter, parent or trainer?

May be we can get some inside from these top dogs (not by USTA ranking):

Top boys:

Alexander Del Corral, Noah Makarome, Michael Zhao, Michael Mmoh, Francis Tiafoe, Spencer Furman, Daniel Raw, Henrik Wiersholm, Martin Joyce, Aleks Huryn, Lane Leschly, Alex Rybakov, Noah Rubin, Spencer Papa, Thomas Mayronne, Nicholas Baez, Maxx Lipman, Connor Farren, Thai-Son Kwiatkowski, Trey Daniel, Bjorn Fratangelo, Alexios Halebian, Shane Vinsant, Gordon Watson, Marcos Giron, Mitchell Frank, Robert Stineman

Top girls:

Sofia Kenin, Catherine Bellis, Dominique Schaefer, Alexandra Sanford, Tornado Ali Black, Nicole Frenkel, Ndindi Ndunda, Rebecca Weissmann, Gabrielle Andrews, Kimberly Yee, Rianna Valdes, Lauren Goodman, Brooke Austin, Liz Jeukeng, Christina Makarova, Josie Kuhlman, Victoria Duval, Samantha Crawford, Jamie Loeb, Chalena Scholl, Jessie Pegula, Krista Hardebeck, Grace Min, Kelsey Laurente, Sabrina Santamaria, Monica Turewicz, Lauren Herring, Sarah Toti

We want to hear from you, press the “Leave a Comment” button on top.

Jul
11

If you visit international tennis tournaments you see players from many different countries, players that can not afford a good hotel, players with full scholarships and those of very wealthy parents. Let us look at all these players and try to identifying future champions.

This seams to fit to be true:

  1. As more hungry a player is as higher is the desire to succeed.
  2. Often parents (or the family) is the engine behind it.
  3. Champions are made not born.

 Let us go further into details. Why is it that players that grow up in countries or areas that don’t have everything often succeed? These players have learned in early ages to fight for everything and nothing is given to them, they had to earn every step of the way, they are hungry to succeed. For these players loosing is a reflection of their performance. As soon as they walk off the court and you ask them, why they lost, they have already taken the next step and know what to do in training to get better and prepared for the next time. These players can not wait to get back on the court. What is also interesting is that often you see players with a wealthy background, that don’t have this drive. They aren’t hungry, why fight for something that they already have.

To become a champion is a long road without any guarantees. However most of the time it is the dedication and sacrifice of the parents that makes a player. I have seen parents that left everything behind and moved to an other country or state. The dedication of the parents does not stop there, often parents are the main motivator for the player after a lost match. However two energies have to join forces, the hunger of the player and the willingness to work hard and the parents love and attitude to steer and enforce the player. The parents often learn how to be the best coach and encourage the player, to go to tournaments with the right attitude. It is a long road and winning today is not a recipe to win tomorrow. These parents are visualizing on building a player tomorrow and not focusing on winning a match today. The advice to parents and players “Never give up, Never surrender”.

Often in magazines we read “players are born”, because that is what people want to believe. Here is the reality, to become a champion is hard work, talent helps but it is not the ticket alone. To get up after a knock-out means that a player needs to be hungry, have the right support and the player is willing to sacrifice a “normal” life. To “Grow into a Champion” a player spends the majority of time on building tennis skills, increase athleticism and endurance.

There is a small number of players that possess all the right ingredients. These are the players that will go the distance and have a chance to rise as champions. After becoming a professional player the game will change from 80 percent hard work and 20 percent mental into 80 percent mental and 20 percent continuously hard work. At the end mental will set the champion apart from the players that know how to play tennis.

A word of caution to all tennis parents, a tennis kid is not an investment for future wealth. Reality is a player ranked 100 in the world may make $100,000 per year, the rest of the lower ranked players need to have an additional source of income to survive. Parents are often presenting their 9 to 12 year old kids and are convinced that they become the next top player in the world. Reality is that there are thousands of kids start to play tennis every day and it is estimated that 60 million people are playing tennis worldwide. So have a reality check once in a while.

Dec
24

I am happy to join with you today in what is called the “tennis dream”. A dream that at one day we will use our youth to demonstrate our strength as a tennis nation. A dream that at one day we will be able to nurture these tennis talents. A dream that at one day we will focus on talent and not on ranking.  

 
 

 

We have come to a time where we look out for no-one but ourselves, coaches that just look for the money, tennis academies that are driven by fame. This is the wrong path. Now is the time to make real the promises to help our tennis talents.

When we look around in our tennis society, we realize quickly that it is almost impossible for gifted young tennis talents to grow into  international players without the right support. 

First, because of the lack of financial resources and second, because of the lack of professional support. Many parents and coaches of tennis talents from the US share these thoughts. 

The tennis dream is to give our talents a chance to succeed. A dream that at one day a Tennis Performance Center nurtures upcoming talents. A dream that no talent will be sent away, but rather receives a chance. A dream that we focus on developing players and not on getting coaches into the news.  

A Tennis Center that is free for all, that focuses on encouraging talented, highly motivated tennis players in their athletic development and show them the way to become a tennis pro and represent the United States. A Tennis Center where kids travel as a group to national tennis tournaments, so that national rankings can be gained by the best players and not by the biggest wallet.  

A Tennis Center that focus not on age or background, but rather on individually tailored training to the child’s performance, technique, tactics and stamina.  

And when this happens, when we have reached this point, than we see clearly that what prevented us from making this dream a reality in the first place was that we spent more time looking out for ourselves and not looking out for growing tennis talents. At that point we see clearly hat we can build a stream of youth and demonstrate our strength as a tennis nation. At that point we see clearly that we are able to nurture our tennis talents. At that point we see clearly that we can focus on talent and not on ranking. 

Knowing that this dream will become reality as soon as many will share this dream. And this will be the day — this will be the day when all of our talented players will be given a chance to reach their potential — this will be the day when we create opportunities independent of “what’s in it for me”. 

Until this day let this dream be spread and inspire tennis parents throughout the US. Let a Tennis Performance Center become reality, a Tennis Performance Center where our juniors are welcome, a Tennis Performance Center that is driven by the dream to inspire many, a Tennis Performance Center that focus on the style and capability of the players, a Tennis Performance Center where the players are top priority and not to bring fame and fortune to the organization or coaches. 

  

 

Jul
08

Tennis AthletDon’t just focus on the kids, integrate the parents. Parents are involved in the education of their kids and parents are an important part of our education system. We have learned this lesson a long time ago, however we are making big mistakes when it comes to tennis.

The biggest mistake been made by American academies is to have a rule in place “parents are not allowed near the court … they have to stay away”. If parents arrive at some American academies or at the USTA training center they will be drilled not to come close to the courts. Often a specific “parents area” is placed in a corner. Parents are pictured by these academies of being the enemy of their own kid(s).

These are the facts:

Every person who has made it in the game had dedicated parents behind them.

Without the dedication of the parents there are no champions.

Without the investment of the parents there wouldn’t be any junior tennis tournaments.

Without the financial support of the parents there wouldn’t be any junior academies or coaches.

Parents are so dedicated to tennis, that they become experts in it. They have dedicated often more than 10 to 15 years focusing on tennis. These parents have something that no tennis coach or academy will ever be able to accomplish. These parents know everything what there is to know about their kid(s) and tennis. If there is something to improve, they figured it out. Often parents are the better coaches, tennis managers and sponsors. Parents are the main engine behind the most professional players, American or foreign.

So why not integrate the parents? We asked that questions at many academies that are enforcing the “off parent policy”. They say parents would interrupt and academies answered that they know best what is good for the kids… Often they stated “Our main coach has trained the best tennis players and that the parents have no experience of how to make a player into a champion (Fact: 90 % of all champions base their success on the parents behind them).

If you find a coach that works with your kid(s) and considers the parents as an important part, great.

Our advice for the dedicated parents that are involved in tennis: Stay away from academies that have a “off parents policy” and don’t want you on the court! It will lead down a road resulting in unhappy junior players, a growing conflict between the academy or coach and the parents and at the end wasted time and effort that may result in minimal improvements.

Show me an academy where the parents are involved and I will show you success.

Player development, Academies & USTA

  • USTA player development: There is still hope for steering player development into the right direction with Patrick McEnroe on the wheel, however McEnroe is more focused on being a spokesperson on TV than focusing on fixing the problem. The USTA is not working with the parents rather than using the “off parents policy” to keep parents at bay.

  • USTA and the best athlete: The USTA’s approach of “getting the best athlete” is not focusing on players with the best talent & potential. Resulting in disappointed US junior players, that never got a chance from the USTA or were turned down by the USTA. These players will eventually turn into pro players that may represent a foreign country instead of the US or resulting in a pro player that is not willing to support the USTA in developing future tennis generations.

  • Parents involvement is the key for player development. A talented player with dedicated parents, they will do what it takes to get the kid(s) to lessons, tournaments and matches, is better than a higher ranked player without parents involvement or parents support. The “off parent policy” is ruining chances, so avoid academies where the parents are not welcomed to stay at the court.

  • Throw coaches off the court if they do not show the ability to focus on your player individual. In other words implement change based on the player and not on “this is what we teach since the last 10 years”.

  • Challenging the players: A player who love the game want to have challenging players. These players don’t want to play each day with kids not up to their level. These players want to hit mostly with players at the same level and sometimes even with better players. These players enjoy to hit the ball. If an academy will not be able to accommodate your kid(s) with challenging players … turn around and leave. Some academies just group players by age instead of placing the player into a performance levels independent of age.

At the end all academies have one thing in common, they run a business and they want to make money. As parents you need to decide what academy is good for the development of your kid(s). What works for some does not work for others. In the end we know that dedicated tennis parents have 10, 15 or even more years of experience in developing junior tennis players …

We invite all dedicated tennis parents to send us your feedback. What is your experience with academies and coaches?

We especially expand our invite to the following tennis players:

BOYS:

ABOUBAKARE, Abraham
ABRAMS, Harrison
AUSTIN, Gonzales
BADGER, Breon N.
BANGOURA, Sekou
BERMAN, Sean
BERNSTEIN, Shaun
BRASSEAUX, Garret
BRITTON, Devin
BROWN, Daniel
BUCHANAN, Chase
CARLETON, Frank
CELESTINE, Terrell
CHA, Chris
CHADWELL, Ian
CHAPPELL, Nick
CHEUNG, Ryan
CHU, Aristotle
CID, Roberto
CLYNES, Patrick
COOK, Thomas
COURT, Jeremy
COX, Jordan
CURRY, Chase
DAVIS, Blake
DOMIJAN, Alexander
DOOLEY, Matthew
EFFERDING, Jeremy
EGGER, Emmett A.
ELORTEGUI, Michael
FANG, Brian
FARREN, Connor
FLOREZ, Carlos Brandon
FORMENTERA, Lawrence L.
FOWLER, Harry
FRANK, Mitchell
FRATANGELO, Bjorn
FREEMAN, Christopher
GIRON, Marcos
HAMMOND, Cale
HARDIE, Warren
HARRINGTON, Hunter
HARRISON, Christian
HARRISON, Ryan
HASEGAWA, Kosuke
HOFFMAN, Daniel C.
HOLINER, David
HOVHANNISYAN, Mousheg
HUNDAL, Vikram S.
JANG-MILSTEN, Henry
JOGI-SINGH, Nevy
JOHNSON, Campbell
JOHNSON, Eric James
KANDATH, Matthew
KASNETZ, Joseph
KHANIN, Daniel
KING, Evan
KORINEK, Andrew
KOSAKOWSKI, Daniel
KRUEGER, Mitchell
KUDLA, Denis
LAM, Carter
LASPRILLA, Matthew
LASTER, Ian
LESLIE, Zachary
LIN, Denis
LIPPENS, Michael
LIPPERT, Wyatt
LIVI, Robert
MARIN, Theodore Sebastian
MAYS, Morgan F.
MCCALL, Daniel
MCCOURT, Zach
MCCOY, Wyatt
MKRTCHIAN, Ken
MOREIRAS, Juan
NEWMAN, Spencer F.
NOBLE, Ryan
NOVIKOV, Dennis
ORE, Junior A.
PARKER, William.R
PASHA, Nathan
PETRONE, Alexander
PHILLIPS, Jadon
POGOSTKIN, Filipp
POLNET, Mitchell J.
POWELL, Ronald
PRINCE, Andrew
RANE, Manas
RIGGS, Danny
RINALDI, Michael Rinaldi
ROBLES, Alex
ROBLES, Austin
SABA, Frederick
SALAZAR, David
SANDGREN, Tennys
SANTIAGO, Mico
SARMIENTO, Raymond
SAVRAN, Matthew
SEABORN, Harry
SEAL, James Bo
SEGUSO, Ridley H.
SIMON, Spencer L.
SIOW, Matthew
SNYDER, Bruno
SOCK, Jack
STEVENS, Max
STROBEL, Trey
STYSLINGER, Mac
SUNDLING, J. T.
SUPERSTEIN, Andrew
TCHAN, Joshua
THEIN, Kurt
THOMPSON, Clay
THORNTON, John-Randolph
TOWNES, Gabriel
VAN OVERBEEK, Johannes Robert
VINSANT, Shane
VLADIMIRSKY, Gregory
WARDEN, John
WEBB, Dane
WESTMORELAND, Matthew
WILLIAMS, Rhyne
WOODARD, John
YEDIGARIAN, Garik
ZHU, Michael

GIRLS:

ABAZA, Jan
ADDISON, Breaunna
AHN, Kristie
ALEXANDER, Jessica
ANDERSON, Kelley
ANDERSON, Robin
ANGHELESCU, Alexandra
AUGUSTINE, Brittany
AUSTIN, Brooke
AUSTIN, Shayne
BARNHILL, Morgan
BARTNIK, Nicole
BASMA, Natasha
BEGLEY, Elizabeth
BEKTAS, Emina
BELAYA, Maria
BERNER, Hannah
BOLENDER, Brooke
BONTE, Alessandra
BOREN, Brynn
BOSERUP, Julia
BRODSKY, Gail
BURDETTE, Mallory
BURNS, Meredith
CAKO, Jacqueline
CALHOUN, Charlotte
CAPRA, Beatrice
CERCONE, Alexandra
CHRISTIAN, Kaitlyn
CLARK, Gabrielle
CLAY, Alexandra
CLAYTON, Mary
COLFFER, Arianna
COS, Paola
COVE, Jessica
DAI, Ashley
DANOSI, Christina F.
DAVIS, Lauren
DE BRUYCKER, Zoe
DESIMONE, Gabrielle
DEWAR, Tristen Z.
DOLEHIDE, Courtney B.
DUVAL, Victoria
ECHEVERRIA ALAM, Nadia
EMBREE, Lauren
ERKAN, Leyla
FALKIN, Allison M.
FRAMPTON, Jade
FULLER, Kate
GAYTAN-LEACH, Cierra
GIBBS, Nicole
GLASPER, Chanel
GOEPEL, Katie
GOLDFELD, Ester
GRIFFITH, Courtney
HAMILTON, Nida
HARRISON, Catherine
HAYLEY, Abby
HERRING, Lauren
HOGAN, Hailey
HOIS, Jenny
HUANG, Jessie
JANOWICZ, Olivia
KAHAN, Rachel
KATZ, Jacqueline
KAY, Whitney P.
KEELER, Brett-Ellen
KEYS, Madison
KHMYLEV, Olga
KILGO, Kenna
KONG, Hai-Li
KONO, Jordana P
KUYKENDALL, Skylar
LABARTHE, Julie
LAMBERT, Aria A.
LANCASTER, Mia
LAO, Danielle
LAURENTE, Kelsey
LEATU, Alexandra
LEE, Sarah
MACFARLANE, Mary Anne
MALLEY, Noelle
MAMALAT, Anna
MAMIIT, Marivick
MANASHIROVA, Fidan
MAR, Hanna
MARTIN, Haley Octavia
MCADOO, Rasheeda
MCCOY, Marica
MCHALE, Christina
MCPHILLIPS, Kyle S.
MEKA, Nikita
MELICHAR, Nicole
MIN, Grace
MONTEZ, Pamela
MORTON, Skylar Alexandra
MUHAMMED, Asia
MULHOLLAND, Annie
NAUTA, Stephanie
NGUYEN, Tamitha
NICHOLS, Millie
NIU, Belinda
O’KONIEWSKI, Molly
OUDIN, Melanie
PARKER, Nicole
PAUL, Jamila
PAWID, Jamie
PEGULA, Jessica
PERETZ, Caryssa L.
PHAM, Sarah
PHIRI, Nelo
PRZESZLOWSKI, Kimberly
QUEVEDO, Dhanielly
RAY, Kaitlin
RITCHIE, Whitney
RIZZOLO, Kayla
ROGERS, Shelby
ROSE, Malika
SABACINSKI, Julie
SANDERS, Brittney
SANFORD, Jordaan.A
SANTAMARIA, Sabrina
SARDINHA, C C
SCHMIDT, Mara
SCHOLL, Chichi
SCOTT, Noel
SHANKLE, Blair
SHIMIZU, Riko
SHUTTER, Scout
SINGH, Namrata
SMITH, Theresa
SMYTH, Lacey
STARR, Denise
STEPHENS, Sloane
STILES, Jessica
SUAREZ, Deborah
SUAREZ, Gina
SULLIVAN, Sierra
SUNDARAM, Kelsey
TACHIBANA, Hideko
TACHOVSKY, Alexandra
TAHIR, Sabrina
TALCOTT, Shelby
TRAN, Desiree
TRAN, Nicolette
TSAY, Ellen
TUREWICZ, Monica
VAN NGUYEN, Chanelle
VANDEWEGHE, Coco
VANDYKE, Bailey
VELASQUEZ, Manuela
VERNER, Holly
VIALLE, Kate
VICKERY, Sachia
VOSBURGH, Teal
WACNIK, Jessica
WEISEL, Julia Lynn
WILL, Allie
WILLIAMS, Caitlyn
WOFFORD, Whitney
WOLFF, Alanna
WOOLAND, Audrey
WORRING, Jessica
WRIGHT, Abby
XEPOLEAS, Lynda
YAJIMA, Monica
YAPP-SHING, Jaime
Jun
23

Everybody knows what a quarterback is. Le us explain what we call The Quarterbacks of Junior Tennis

In Football the quarterback role is one of the most visible and important roles on the team. The quarterback touches the ball on nearly every offensive play and has a great deal of responsibility both in calling plays and making decisions during the play. The Quarterbacks of Junior Tennis are individual players that are very visible in tournaments. These players work very hard and play mostly an offensive play. These are the kind of players that try to take control of the game and making their own game plan decisions. They love to go for the ball, have a good foot-work and are fast and they are not “moonballers”, “dinkers” or “no power retrievers” that you often find in junior tournaments. In other words they may not win all the time, but in our opinion these are the boys that everybody is watching, they have an exciting game. And they may be on the pathway of greatness… but it will take years to come.

We wish these players all the best – hope that you will find a full sponsorship – we hope that one day we will see you play in an international tennis event and you will represent the USA with flying colors.

So in our opinion these are the Quarterbacks of Junior Tennis:

Boys 10 & 11:

Sami Kierberg (FL), Justin Lee (CT), Noah Makarome (FL), Cody Rakela (CA), Alexander Del Corral (FL), Eric Nguyen (CA)

Boys 11 & 12:

Javier Restrepo (FL), Spencer Furman (WA), Victor Pham (CA), Taylor Fritz (CA), Tommy Hunter (KS), Gabriel Pilones (FL),

Boys 12 & 13:

Christian Langmo (FL), Jimmy Bendeck (FL), David Chrisovan (FL), Robert Seby (AZ), Tommy Paul (NC), Gregory Anderson (AZ)

Boys 13 & 14:

Drew Dawson (CA), Spencer Papa (OK), Christian Garay (GA), Jordan Belga (IL), Paul Oosterbaan (MI), Alexander Saltiel (FL), Baker Newman (FL), Jacob Dunbar (OH), Grayson Goldin (FL)

Boys 14 & 15:

Jake Albo (FL),  Sean Karl (TN), Mackenzie McDonald (CA), Justin Crenshaw (FL), Roy Lederman (FL), Ryan Smith (FL), Trey Daniel (KS), Thai Kwiatkowski (NC), Connor Farren (CA), Tyler Gardiner (MI)

Boys 15 & 16:

Anthony Delcore (NE), Anthony Tsodicov (CA), Austin Smith (GA), Richard Del Nunzio (NY), Daniel McCall (CA), Jeremy Efferding (FL), Shane Vinsant (TX)

Boys 16 & 17:

Gonzales Austin (FL), Spencer Newman (FL), Dennis Novikov (FL), Nathan Pasha (GA), Junior Ore (MD), Mitchell Frank (VA)

Families, players and fans if you have an update on a current event please post it here.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.