Us Tennis Parents
Things about Junior Tennis

Why American Academies Dislike Tennis Parents!

Tennis AthletDon’t just focus on the kids, integrate the parents. Parents are involved in the education of their kids and parents are an important part of our education system. We have learned this lesson a long time ago, however we are making big mistakes when it comes to tennis.

The biggest mistake been made by American academies is to have a rule in place “parents are not allowed near the court … they have to stay away”. If parents arrive at some American academies or at the USTA training center they will be drilled not to come close to the courts. Often a specific “parents area” is placed in a corner. Parents are pictured by these academies of being the enemy of their own kid(s).

These are the facts:

Every person who has made it in the game had dedicated parents behind them.

Without the dedication of the parents there are no champions.

Without the investment of the parents there wouldn’t be any junior tennis tournaments.

Without the financial support of the parents there wouldn’t be any junior academies or coaches.

Parents are so dedicated to tennis, that they become experts in it. They have dedicated often more than 10 to 15 years focusing on tennis. These parents have something that no tennis coach or academy will ever be able to accomplish. These parents know everything what there is to know about their kid(s) and tennis. If there is something to improve, they figured it out. Often parents are the better coaches, tennis managers and sponsors. Parents are the main engine behind the most professional players, American or foreign.

So why not integrate the parents? We asked that questions at many academies that are enforcing the “off parent policy”. They say parents would interrupt and academies answered that they know best what is good for the kids… Often they stated “Our main coach has trained the best tennis players and that the parents have no experience of how to make a player into a champion (Fact: 90 % of all champions base their success on the parents behind them).

If you find a coach that works with your kid(s) and considers the parents as an important part, great.

Our advice for the dedicated parents that are involved in tennis: Stay away from academies that have a “off parents policy” and don’t want you on the court! It will lead down a road resulting in unhappy junior players, a growing conflict between the academy or coach and the parents and at the end wasted time and effort that may result in minimal improvements.

Show me an academy where the parents are involved and I will show you success.

Player development, Academies & USTA

  • USTA player development: There is still hope for steering player development into the right direction with Patrick McEnroe on the wheel, however McEnroe is more focused on being a spokesperson on TV than focusing on fixing the problem. The USTA is not working with the parents rather than using the “off parents policy” to keep parents at bay.

  • USTA and the best athlete: The USTA’s approach of “getting the best athlete” is not focusing on players with the best talent & potential. Resulting in disappointed US junior players, that never got a chance from the USTA or were turned down by the USTA. These players will eventually turn into pro players that may represent a foreign country instead of the US or resulting in a pro player that is not willing to support the USTA in developing future tennis generations.

  • Parents involvement is the key for player development. A talented player with dedicated parents, they will do what it takes to get the kid(s) to lessons, tournaments and matches, is better than a higher ranked player without parents involvement or parents support. The “off parent policy” is ruining chances, so avoid academies where the parents are not welcomed to stay at the court.

  • Throw coaches off the court if they do not show the ability to focus on your player individual. In other words implement change based on the player and not on “this is what we teach since the last 10 years”.

  • Challenging the players: A player who love the game want to have challenging players. These players don’t want to play each day with kids not up to their level. These players want to hit mostly with players at the same level and sometimes even with better players. These players enjoy to hit the ball. If an academy will not be able to accommodate your kid(s) with challenging players … turn around and leave. Some academies just group players by age instead of placing the player into a performance levels independent of age.

At the end all academies have one thing in common, they run a business and they want to make money. As parents you need to decide what academy is good for the development of your kid(s). What works for some does not work for others. In the end we know that dedicated tennis parents have 10, 15 or even more years of experience in developing junior tennis players …

We invite all dedicated tennis parents to send us your feedback. What is your experience with academies and coaches?

We especially expand our invite to the following tennis players:

BOYS:

ABOUBAKARE, Abraham
ABRAMS, Harrison
AUSTIN, Gonzales
BADGER, Breon N.
BANGOURA, Sekou
BERMAN, Sean
BERNSTEIN, Shaun
BRASSEAUX, Garret
BRITTON, Devin
BROWN, Daniel
BUCHANAN, Chase
CARLETON, Frank
CELESTINE, Terrell
CHA, Chris
CHADWELL, Ian
CHAPPELL, Nick
CHEUNG, Ryan
CHU, Aristotle
CID, Roberto
CLYNES, Patrick
COOK, Thomas
COURT, Jeremy
COX, Jordan
CURRY, Chase
DAVIS, Blake
DOMIJAN, Alexander
DOOLEY, Matthew
EFFERDING, Jeremy
EGGER, Emmett A.
ELORTEGUI, Michael
FANG, Brian
FARREN, Connor
FLOREZ, Carlos Brandon
FORMENTERA, Lawrence L.
FOWLER, Harry
FRANK, Mitchell
FRATANGELO, Bjorn
FREEMAN, Christopher
GIRON, Marcos
HAMMOND, Cale
HARDIE, Warren
HARRINGTON, Hunter
HARRISON, Christian
HARRISON, Ryan
HASEGAWA, Kosuke
HOFFMAN, Daniel C.
HOLINER, David
HOVHANNISYAN, Mousheg
HUNDAL, Vikram S.
JANG-MILSTEN, Henry
JOGI-SINGH, Nevy
JOHNSON, Campbell
JOHNSON, Eric James
KANDATH, Matthew
KASNETZ, Joseph
KHANIN, Daniel
KING, Evan
KORINEK, Andrew
KOSAKOWSKI, Daniel
KRUEGER, Mitchell
KUDLA, Denis
LAM, Carter
LASPRILLA, Matthew
LASTER, Ian
LESLIE, Zachary
LIN, Denis
LIPPENS, Michael
LIPPERT, Wyatt
LIVI, Robert
MARIN, Theodore Sebastian
MAYS, Morgan F.
MCCALL, Daniel
MCCOURT, Zach
MCCOY, Wyatt
MKRTCHIAN, Ken
MOREIRAS, Juan
NEWMAN, Spencer F.
NOBLE, Ryan
NOVIKOV, Dennis
ORE, Junior A.
PARKER, William.R
PASHA, Nathan
PETRONE, Alexander
PHILLIPS, Jadon
POGOSTKIN, Filipp
POLNET, Mitchell J.
POWELL, Ronald
PRINCE, Andrew
RANE, Manas
RIGGS, Danny
RINALDI, Michael Rinaldi
ROBLES, Alex
ROBLES, Austin
SABA, Frederick
SALAZAR, David
SANDGREN, Tennys
SANTIAGO, Mico
SARMIENTO, Raymond
SAVRAN, Matthew
SEABORN, Harry
SEAL, James Bo
SEGUSO, Ridley H.
SIMON, Spencer L.
SIOW, Matthew
SNYDER, Bruno
SOCK, Jack
STEVENS, Max
STROBEL, Trey
STYSLINGER, Mac
SUNDLING, J. T.
SUPERSTEIN, Andrew
TCHAN, Joshua
THEIN, Kurt
THOMPSON, Clay
THORNTON, John-Randolph
TOWNES, Gabriel
VAN OVERBEEK, Johannes Robert
VINSANT, Shane
VLADIMIRSKY, Gregory
WARDEN, John
WEBB, Dane
WESTMORELAND, Matthew
WILLIAMS, Rhyne
WOODARD, John
YEDIGARIAN, Garik
ZHU, Michael

GIRLS:

ABAZA, Jan
ADDISON, Breaunna
AHN, Kristie
ALEXANDER, Jessica
ANDERSON, Kelley
ANDERSON, Robin
ANGHELESCU, Alexandra
AUGUSTINE, Brittany
AUSTIN, Brooke
AUSTIN, Shayne
BARNHILL, Morgan
BARTNIK, Nicole
BASMA, Natasha
BEGLEY, Elizabeth
BEKTAS, Emina
BELAYA, Maria
BERNER, Hannah
BOLENDER, Brooke
BONTE, Alessandra
BOREN, Brynn
BOSERUP, Julia
BRODSKY, Gail
BURDETTE, Mallory
BURNS, Meredith
CAKO, Jacqueline
CALHOUN, Charlotte
CAPRA, Beatrice
CERCONE, Alexandra
CHRISTIAN, Kaitlyn
CLARK, Gabrielle
CLAY, Alexandra
CLAYTON, Mary
COLFFER, Arianna
COS, Paola
COVE, Jessica
DAI, Ashley
DANOSI, Christina F.
DAVIS, Lauren
DE BRUYCKER, Zoe
DESIMONE, Gabrielle
DEWAR, Tristen Z.
DOLEHIDE, Courtney B.
DUVAL, Victoria
ECHEVERRIA ALAM, Nadia
EMBREE, Lauren
ERKAN, Leyla
FALKIN, Allison M.
FRAMPTON, Jade
FULLER, Kate
GAYTAN-LEACH, Cierra
GIBBS, Nicole
GLASPER, Chanel
GOEPEL, Katie
GOLDFELD, Ester
GRIFFITH, Courtney
HAMILTON, Nida
HARRISON, Catherine
HAYLEY, Abby
HERRING, Lauren
HOGAN, Hailey
HOIS, Jenny
HUANG, Jessie
JANOWICZ, Olivia
KAHAN, Rachel
KATZ, Jacqueline
KAY, Whitney P.
KEELER, Brett-Ellen
KEYS, Madison
KHMYLEV, Olga
KILGO, Kenna
KONG, Hai-Li
KONO, Jordana P
KUYKENDALL, Skylar
LABARTHE, Julie
LAMBERT, Aria A.
LANCASTER, Mia
LAO, Danielle
LAURENTE, Kelsey
LEATU, Alexandra
LEE, Sarah
MACFARLANE, Mary Anne
MALLEY, Noelle
MAMALAT, Anna
MAMIIT, Marivick
MANASHIROVA, Fidan
MAR, Hanna
MARTIN, Haley Octavia
MCADOO, Rasheeda
MCCOY, Marica
MCHALE, Christina
MCPHILLIPS, Kyle S.
MEKA, Nikita
MELICHAR, Nicole
MIN, Grace
MONTEZ, Pamela
MORTON, Skylar Alexandra
MUHAMMED, Asia
MULHOLLAND, Annie
NAUTA, Stephanie
NGUYEN, Tamitha
NICHOLS, Millie
NIU, Belinda
O’KONIEWSKI, Molly
OUDIN, Melanie
PARKER, Nicole
PAUL, Jamila
PAWID, Jamie
PEGULA, Jessica
PERETZ, Caryssa L.
PHAM, Sarah
PHIRI, Nelo
PRZESZLOWSKI, Kimberly
QUEVEDO, Dhanielly
RAY, Kaitlin
RITCHIE, Whitney
RIZZOLO, Kayla
ROGERS, Shelby
ROSE, Malika
SABACINSKI, Julie
SANDERS, Brittney
SANFORD, Jordaan.A
SANTAMARIA, Sabrina
SARDINHA, C C
SCHMIDT, Mara
SCHOLL, Chichi
SCOTT, Noel
SHANKLE, Blair
SHIMIZU, Riko
SHUTTER, Scout
SINGH, Namrata
SMITH, Theresa
SMYTH, Lacey
STARR, Denise
STEPHENS, Sloane
STILES, Jessica
SUAREZ, Deborah
SUAREZ, Gina
SULLIVAN, Sierra
SUNDARAM, Kelsey
TACHIBANA, Hideko
TACHOVSKY, Alexandra
TAHIR, Sabrina
TALCOTT, Shelby
TRAN, Desiree
TRAN, Nicolette
TSAY, Ellen
TUREWICZ, Monica
VAN NGUYEN, Chanelle
VANDEWEGHE, Coco
VANDYKE, Bailey
VELASQUEZ, Manuela
VERNER, Holly
VIALLE, Kate
VICKERY, Sachia
VOSBURGH, Teal
WACNIK, Jessica
WEISEL, Julia Lynn
WILL, Allie
WILLIAMS, Caitlyn
WOFFORD, Whitney
WOLFF, Alanna
WOOLAND, Audrey
WORRING, Jessica
WRIGHT, Abby
XEPOLEAS, Lynda
YAJIMA, Monica
YAPP-SHING, Jaime
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9 Responses to “Why American Academies Dislike Tennis Parents!”

  1. Over generalizations. Many champs have developed with supportive parents IN THE BACKGROUND! There is a difference in parents being supportive and parents being on the court during lessons at the academy. Sampras and Federer did not have their parents on court while being instructed.

    I have been around junior tennis for decades and no offense, 90-95% of tennis parents are harmful to their kid’s development.

    This blog seems all about a failed tennis parent, blaming everyone. The bottom line is that talented and hard working kids from other countries have been discovered. Their parents are dirt poor and they grew up playing on horrible courts. No excuses.

  2. Try training your son without any financial help from the USTA is disater unless you have the fortitude of Peter Townes, Gabriel Townes;s father. Father and son work extremely hard to do what they do and the academies don’t want any involvement from the father. Which is ludicrous because Pete has been coaching Gabriel since he was three and recently, Gabriel has been playing in futures and has made it to the 2nd round of qualifying in both. Good luck Pete and Gabriel!

  3. If a coach will become a professional in his field, than parents are professionals for tennis as well as parenting. I am always surprised to read comments from coaches trying to harm parents by insulting them. Without parents (that pay the hourly fee) there are no coaches etc. If parents spend 10 or more years coaching tennis they have become often better coaches than the average “I know everything better” coach.

    No excuses to bad coaches – teachers are certified to teach our kids, coaches aren’t!!! And still they talk as they know more about other kids. All power to parents that are trying to give their kids a better future.

  4. to any tennis coach, a student is just a number. To any tennis parents, their kid is a player they want to be the best. If tennis coach does not like the parents get involved, think it twice, who pays the cost, who spend the endless hours to go with the kid for the tournaments. In my opinion, if an average coach dedicates 90% of his/her attention to the kid, the kid can become a champion.

  5. From the coaches perspective, it certainly is a matter of control on the court. And as parents, well, that is a hard pill to swallow. Because we naturally want to provide input toward our kid’s future development in every area they choose. Tennis is no exception. Therefore, almost right away, the seeds of future conflicts between coach(s) and parent(s) may be sewn? In any case, parents are the mainstay of junior tennis. Without the tens of millions of dollars poured into Junior Tennis, every year, by thousands of dedicated, loving parents, THERE WOULD BE NO JUNIOR TENNIS! So, please coach, give Mom and Dad a break.

  6. I agree to this 100%!! …especially might be more applicable in Womens Tennis.

    …just see the roles of the Parents in the development of the following World #1’s

    Chris Evert
    Steffi Graf
    Monica Seles
    Jennifer Capriati
    Venus and Serena Williams
    Maria Sharapova

    I don’t think its coincidence that all of them had one thing in common – A dedicated parent …and dedicated is an understatement in these cases.

  7. We don’t need to be talking about a coach and parent clashing over on court tennis training. Isn’t 90% of tennis mental? I see parent involvement as being crucial when it comes to being a soft place to fall and sharing their expertise with a coach on what makes their child tick.

    My child will hear her coach, but she also likes to be listened to and understood. It may make sense to remain distant from opponents, but my child is outgoing and thrives on friendship. When it comes to tennis, I don’t know the first thing about it, but I love the positive psychology revolution and the nuances of body language.

  8. Most parents are not certified tennis coaches. Most parents of successful tennis players never try to teach their own children the fundamentals of the game. They wisely leave this to experts in the coaching field. However, parents of successful tennis players always advocate for their children, always stay updated on their children’s skill development, always provide emotional support and watch for signs of emotionally abusive coaching, and do their best to provide the money needed to cover the costs of lessons and tournaments. The wisest and most mature parents do not live vicariously through their children, nor do they attempt to rigidly control their children’s interests.
    If the training emphasizes fundamentals while enhancing self-esteem, if the natural athleticism is high enough, and if the child is TRULY DESIROUS of becoming a PROFESSIONAL player, nothing on earth will stop the achievement of this goal short of an uncontrollable accident.

    • No…I don’t agree that all a kid needs is desire. Why? Because they are still a kid with no idea how to reach that goal. You need a very dedicated adult who has the wisdom to help you by giving you OPPORTUNITIES to train as you should. That is what the parents of the top ten ranked players in the world did. The kid could never ever have achieved this without that extra input from a very dedicated parent. No question that this is true. Kids just do not know what it takes to get there…cause their brains aren’t fully formed and they as yet lack the fortitude and wisdom.


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